Lake Erie Ecosystem Priority (LEEP)

Home

Lake Erie Ecosystem Priority (LEEP)

A Balanced Diet for Lake Erie: Reducing Phosphorus Loadings and Harmful Algal Blooms

Read the report

The Commission engaged stakeholders and the general public about LEEP

Comments

 

In 2011, Lake Erie experienced its largest algal bloom in history. In 2012, the International Joint Commission (IJC) established the Lake Erie Ecosystem Priority
(LEEP) in response to a growing challenge: lake-wide changes in Lake Erie related to problems of phosphorus enrichment from both rural and urban sources,
compounded by the influence of climate change and aquatic invasive species. These changes have resulted in impaired water quality, with impacts on ecosystem
health, drinking water supplies, fisheries, recreation and tourism, and property values.

A Balanced Diet for Lake Erie: Reducing Phosphorus Loadings and Harmful Algal Blooms presents the IJC’s key findings and recommendations from the
LEEP study.


Twitter

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News

Latest News Clips

2014/04/13
Local groups join protest agains manure on snow (Lenconnect.com)

2014/04/14
Will fertilizer-certification program cut algae blooms? (The Columbus Dispatch)

2014/04/14
Ag fertilizer bill has broad support (Press Publications)

2014/04/07
Council hears from Ottawa SWCD (Port Clinton News Herald)

2014/04/03
Farmers hear why and how they can help heal Lake Erie (The Beacon)

2014/03/31
Three-Year Cover Crop Project Reduces Nutrient Loads in Great Lakes (Pennsylvania Ag Connection)

2014/03/27
Report offers solutions to Lake Erie algae blooms (Outdoor News)

View all