NYPA crews pull one of the first pontoon strings out to Lake Erie to begin the installation of the ice boom for the 2018-19 ice season.

Ice Boom Information

Ice Boom Update March 11, 2020

New York Power Authority completed removal of the ice boom spans from Lake Erie on March 5, 2020. Work is expected to continue in the area to place the components of the ice boom into storage.


Ice Boom Update March 4, 2020

New York Power Authority continued removal of the ice boom March 3, 2020. Eleven spans were removed from the Canadian side. At end of day March 3, eight of the twenty-two spans remained on Lake Erie. Removal is planned to continue as weather conditions and safe working conditions allow.

Lake Erie - Niagara River Ice Boom March 3, 2020
New York Power Authority continued removal of the Lake Erie - Niagara River ice boom spans on 3 March 2020, despite fog on the eastern basin of Lake Erie.

 

LENR Ice Boom Removal March 2, 2020
NYPA tug and barge begin removal of the ice boom for the 2019-2020 season.

Ice Boom Update March 3, 2020

New York Power Authority began removal of the ice boom March 2, 2020. Removal began on the USA side, successfully removing three spans. Removal is planned to continue as weather conditions and safe working conditions allow.

 


Ice Boom Update March 2, 2020

Preparations are underway for removal of the Lake Erie - Niagara River Ice Boom. If weather allows for safe working conditions, crews from the New York Power Authority will begin opening the boom’s 22 spans on Monday March 2, 2020.

Due to above freezing temperatures for much of this winter season no notable ice cover formed on Lake Erie for the 2019-2020 ice season. On February 27, 2020 the water temperature near the ice boom was 1.1°C (34°F). Considering the lack of ice cover on Lake Erie and the absence of ice in the Maid-of-the-Mist Pool below Niagara Falls, preparations are underway for the removal of the Lake Erie – Niagara River Ice Boom.

 


More Information

Ice Boom Reports can be found here.

The Ice Boom is operated by the New York Power Authority to reduce the potential for ice jams in the Niagara River. For further information, see Frequently Asked Questions on the Ice Boom.

The New York Power Authority Ice Boom camera shows current images of the boom.

This video from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers describes the boom and how it is monitored in cooperation with the International Niagara Board of Control and other agencies.